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2008/Blue Pie Music

by Erica Wheeler

The 11 songs on GOOD SUMMER RAIN span from the intimate streets of Greenwich Village to the sweeping vistas of Jackson Hole, reaching out to where farmland gives way to urban sprawl, wilderness gives way to industrial growth. The CD creates a vivid travelogue of the North American landscape, often feeling as expansive as the land itself. They encompass  both the beauty and the grit of our world today, leaving the listener to contemplate the impacts of change, and the dilemmas that ensue.

The CD was sponsored in part by The Trust for Public Land, a national organization which works to conserve land for people.  Together, Erica and TPL are working to help foster the connection between people and place, inspiring the sense of engagement needed to participate in land stewardship today.


The Specs
Produced and recorded in Boston by Crit Harmon (Martin Sexton, Mary Gauthier, Lori McKenna) GOOD SUMMER RAIN draws on some of the Northeast's finest session musicians, fusing the rootsy Americana sounds of dobro, mandolin, guitar and drums with the elegance of piano and upright bass to offer a rich textural foundation for Erica's expressive lyrics and intimate, conversational vocal style.

Reviews

"If this CD doesn't compel you to get outside and enjoy what little green space we have left, put it on for a mental break while you're stuck in the concrete grid of rush hour."  -Performing Songwriter Magazine

"Listening to Good Summer Rain is like flipping through the photo album of an Ansel Adams road trip. Each artfully created song transports the listener to a particular location, like a snapshot in time." -Planet Jackson Hole News

"Her songs measure the cost of urban sprawl not in terms of species endangered, but in memories lost. Her lyrics evoke all the trails we've hiked, the streams swum, the trees climbed, and all the moments of growth enjoyed there--the silent epiphanies, the stolen kisses--without ever sounding preachy. But when she drops the truism "Your children won't know (the land) the way I did," suddenly your local zoning battle may seem a little more interesting." -Yankee Magazine